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#2 Spring: Manipulating Salesforce objects

Posted by Tech Team on Apr 9, 2013

In Part 1 of this topic, we saw how to do OAuth authentication with Salesforce  using Spring. In this part, we'll see how to fetch and update records  and upload documents to Salesforce using Force.com REST API.

Using Force.com REST API from Spring Web application - Part 2: Manipulating Salesforce objects

Force.com  REST API Resources are used to manipulate objects, execute queries,  display API information etc. Each resource is tied with a specific resource URI which is used to read, create or update record. All URIs  have common base URI: "http://domain/services/data". Domain is usually instance URL retrieved during authentication, or a domain pointing to some Salesforce instance.

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Topics: Spring/Hibernate, Tech

#1 Spring Web application: Authentication

Posted by Tech Team on Apr 8, 2013

Force.com  REST API provides a simple and powerful way of communicating with  Force.com. It is a great way for a secure programmatic access and  interaction with Force.com from a Web or mobile application using REST-based web services.

Using Force.com REST API from Spring Web application - Part 1: Authentication

The API is based on using Force.com REST Resources. REST resource can be a single data record or a collection of records,  like Salesforce objects or custom objects. Each resource is identified  by a named URI, and is accessed using standard HTTP methods (HEAD, GET,  POST, PATCH, DELETE).

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Topics: Spring/Hibernate, Tech

Form Handler Porting

Posted by Tech Team on May 15, 2012

Problem: Different concepts between ATG Form Handlers and Spring MVC

While Spring MVC entirely follows Model-View-Controller design pattern, ATG Form Handler architecture does not. Maybe we should rephrase that, “While Spring MVC makes your application follow MVC design pattern, ATG Form Handler does not”. Spring has a nice separation between Model, View and Controller. Spring has introduced nice abstractions for every part of MVC architecture, you have your controllers annotated with @Controller annotation, your model objects (often called command objects) annotated with @ModelAttribute and you decide which view will be rendered by returning View abstraction from your handle method. ATG does not have such a nice clean separation of concerns. In ATG, in most of applications,   Model and Controller are joined together.

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Topics: Spring/Hibernate, Tech