Faulty Code Carries Consequences in Digital Health

Developers and coders are a hot commodity and the boom in start-ups around digital health combined with increased health IT spending is making qualified developers harder to find. It’s a classic example of supply not keeping pace with demand. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, approximately 1.4 million computer science jobs are expected by 2020, but only 400,000 new computer science graduates to meet the demand.

With the increase in mobile device applications and further implementation of electronic health records, privacy and security is a growing concern. Naturally, patients expect healthcare organizations to take the necessary steps to safeguard their personal information. 

Continue reading “Faulty Code Carries Consequences in Digital Health”

Feds use EHR certification to push transparency

Ensuring that your electronic health record product meets tightening federal certification requirements is getting more challenging as officials scrutinize health IT products more closely for hot-topic issues such as patient privacy, health information exchange and general transparency about their real-world capabilities.

Over the past several weeks, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT has been busy issuing proposed rules and publishing the names of non-complying vendors’ products. This flurry of activity has taken place in the several weeks leading up to ONC’s annual meeting in Washington DC.

A March 2nd proposal would give the ONC expanded authority to regulate health IT products under the certification program set up as part of the health IT incentive program known as HITECH. In response, a number of industry and health IT advocacy groups had responded that they were worried that the proposal was too far-reaching.

Continue reading “Feds use EHR certification to push transparency”

Alternatives to Traditional Insurance:  Aligning the Accrual of Benefits

The healthcare delivery system is undergoing tremendous change because of pressures to increase access, reduce costs and improve outcomes.  New and innovative approaches to how care is being delivered are emerging and the shift to population health, along with an emphasis in engaging patients in self-management activities, are all contributing to the transformation of healthcare in the United States.

doctor-patient-1080408_1920.png

Continue reading “Alternatives to Traditional Insurance:  Aligning the Accrual of Benefits”

Exchanges 3.0? How health insurance marketplaces are evolving

Consumers are buying health insurance in new ways these days, while still turning to in-person help for making a choice — even in the age of the online economy.

The end of January brought the end of open enrollment for the third year of the exchanges, a key part of the Affordable Care Act. It’s been a rocky trip for all involved, especially consumers, many of whom were digital-savvy purchasers of all kinds of goods and services before the ACA.

HiRes-1.jpg

Continue reading “Exchanges 3.0? How health insurance marketplaces are evolving”

Apps vs Providers – Why only 2% of patients are using hospital-provided mobile apps?

You can lead a health care consumer to your mobile app, but you can’t make them use it, suggests a new report from consulting firm Accenture. It found, in a survey of 100 large U.S. hospitals, that just 2 percent of their patients are using hospital-provided mobile apps, even though two-thirds of the hospitals made them available.

The problem, Accenture said, was that the hospitals largely failed to provide consumers with the kinds of functions they want most. For consumers, those are access to medical records, the ability to make appointments, and an option to request prescription refills. Just 11 percent of the surveyed hospitals offered those functionalities.

82497159_thumbnail.jpg

Continue reading “Apps vs Providers – Why only 2% of patients are using hospital-provided mobile apps?”